Why the new icons?

We want it to be easy to tell which items fit different dietary needs - and that means making it easier for you to recognize when an item is Kosher, non-dairy, no sugar added, and more! Check out our new icons (with the description of what they mean) below!

For allergy-sensitive consumers, we always recommend checking the ingredients by clicking on an item in the Marketplace for a more detailed look at what's included in the ingredient list.

Hungry Harvest Marketplace Icons:


Dairy-Free

The dairy-free icon indicates an item that has no milk, cheese, cream, milk powder, or other dairy ingredients in the product.


Organic

Organic items will be 100% USDA-certified organic. This includes complying with USDA guidelines for the contents and production of any given item with this label.


Fair Trade

Fair trade indicates sourcing from a company or producer that promotes fair labor and social standards across all aspects of production to ensure that the supply chain operates sustainably for all workers and producers.


Gluten-Free

No gluten? No problem! Watch for this icon that indicates a product does not contain gluten.


No Sugar Added

If you're trying to cut back, or just prefer to avoid added sugars, watch out for this icon on the Marketplace. Keep in mind that this doesn't account for natural sugars (that occur naturally in fruits and other ingredients) but refers to sugar added during the manufacturing process.


Kosher

This food will conform to Kosher dietary laws.


No Salt Added

This product will not have added salt!


Vegan

Vegan products will contain no animal byproducts, including, but not limited to: dairy, meat, rennet, shellfish, eggs, or animal gelatin.


Upcycled

These products will take the by-product, unwanted, or wasted materials of a product and reimagine them in another tasty way.


Non GMO

This means this product was produced without genetic engineering and its ingredients are not derived from GMOs.


Paleo

A food labeled as paleo means it does not contain ingredients that became common when farming emerged about 10,000 years ago, such as dairy products, legumes, and grains.

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